Concert Information

ZZ Top & The Doobie Brothers

Maryhill Winery presents

ZZ Top & The Doobie Brothers

The Doobie Brothers

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

$76.00 - $160.00

Click for Presale tickets

TICKETS GO ON SALE TO THE PUBLIC 3/24 @10AM PDT

ZZ Top
ZZ Top
ZZ TOP a/k/a "That Little Ol' Band From Texas," lay undisputed claim to being the longest running major rock band with original personnel intact and, in 2004, the Texas trio was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Of course, there are only three of them – Billy F Gibbons, Dusty Hill, Frank Beard -- but it's still a remarkable achievement that they're still very much together after almost 45 years of rock, blues, and boogie on the road and in the studio. "Yeah," says Billy, guitarist extraordinaire, "we're the same three guys, bashing out the same three chords." With the release of each of their albums the band has explored new ground in terms of both their sonic approach and the material they've recorded. ZZ TOP is the same but always changing.

It was in Houston in the waning days of 1969 that ZZ TOP coalesced from the core of two rival bands, Billy's Moving Sidewalks and Frank and Dusty's American Blues. The new group went on to record the appropriately titled ZZ Top's First Album and Rio Grande Mud that reflected their strong blues roots. Their third, 1973's Tres Hombres, catapulted them to national attention with the hit "La Grange," still one of the band's signature pieces today. The song is unabashed elemental boogie, celebrating the institution that came to be known as "the best little whorehouse in Texas." Their next hit was "Tush," a song about, well, let's just say the pursuit of "the good life" that was featured on their Fandango! album, released in 1975. The band's momentum and success built during its first decade, culminating in the legendary "World Wide Texas Tour," a production that included a longhorn steer, a buffalo, buzzards, rattlesnakes and a Texas-shaped stage. As a touring unit, they've been without peer over the years, having performed before millions of fans through North America on numerous epochal tours as well as overseas where they've enthralled audiences from Slovenia to Argentina, from Australia to Sweden, from Russia to Japan and most points in between. Their iconography – beards, cars, girls and that magic keychain – seems to transcend all bounds of geography and language.

Following a lengthy hiatus during which the individual members of the band traveled the world, they switched labels (from British Decca's London label to Warner Bros.) and returned with two amazingly provocative albums, Deguello and El Loco. Their next release, Eliminator, was something of a paradigm shift for ZZ TOP. Their roots blues skew was intact but added to the mix were tech-age trappings that soon found a visual outlet with the nascent MTV. Suddenly, Billy, Dusty and Frank were video icons, playing a kind of Greek chorus in videos that highlighted the album's three smash singles: "Gimme All Your Lovin', "Sharp Dressed Man" and "Legs." The melding of grungy guitar-based blues with synth-pop was seamless and continued with the follow-up album Afterburner as they continued their chart juggernaut. ZZ TOP had accomplished the impossible; they had moved with the times while simultaneously bucking ephemeral trends that crossed their path. They had become more popular and more iconic without ever having to be "flavor of the week." They had become a certified rock institution, contemporary in every way, yet still completely connected to the founding fathers of the genre.

They stayed with Warner for one more album, Recycler, released in 1990 and switched to RCA where they debuted with Antenna and followed with Rhythmeen, XXX and Mescalero. Beyond that, both a lavish four CD box set compilation, Chrome, Smoke & B.B.Q. and a two-CD distillation of that package, Rancho Texicano, were released by Warner prior to The Complete Studio Albums set.

In 2012, ZZ TOP unveiled LA FUTURA, their first studio album in nine years. Produced by Rick Rubin and Billy F Gibbons, and released on American Recordings, it reflected the solid blues inspiration that has powered the band since the very beginning with a contemporary approach that underscored the group's inclination to experiment and explore new sonic vistas. The album included the widely lauded "I Gotsta Get Paid" that has become both a video and in-concert sensation. ZZ Top's rich history became the subject of a box set release the following year. ZZ Top: The Complete Studio Albums 1970-1990 offered no fewer than 10 of the band's most lauded albums all with the original mixes restored.

ZZ TOP's brand new career retrospective The Very Baddest spans the entire course of their London, Warner Bros. and RCA years. Listeners can follow the evolution of the band's sound from the early 70s into the 00s on either a 40 track double CD or a 20 track single CD. Live at Montreux 2013, just released on Eagle Rock Entertainment on both Blu-ray and DVD formats, showcases their live act, leaving no doubt as to why they have been such a huge concert draw for the last several decades. When it comes to the live experience, they've still got it.

The elements that keep ZZ TOP fresh, enduring and above the transitory fray can be summed up in the three words of the band's internal mantra: "Tone, Taste and Tenacity." Of course, the three members of the band have done their utmost to do their part in assuring that ZZ TOP prevails. As genuine roots musicians, the members of the band have few peers. Billy is widely regarded as one of American finest blues guitarists working in the rock idiom. His influences are both the originators of the form – Muddy Waters, B.B. King, et al – as well as the British blues rockers who emerged the generation before ZZ's ascendance. In his early days of playing, no less an idol that Jimi Hendrix singled him out for praise. Part mad scientist, part prankster, he's a musical innovator of the highest order and a certified "guitar god." He's a recurring small screen presence in the hit TV series Bones in which he plays a bearded, gruff, rock guitarist. No type casting problems for Billy.

Dusty has long had an affinity for rock's origins; his earliest performances as a child included Elvis songs convincingly performed. Not only is he a bass virtuoso in his own right, his vocal prowess is awe-inspiring. He's the lead voice you hear on "Tush" and his ferocious vocals are heard, to great effect, on his idol Elvis Presley's "Jailhouse Rock," these days, often a concert encore number and recorded by the band on Fandango! Good natured and diligent, Dusty is the rock solid bottom of ZZ TOP.

Frank has also been keeping the beat in that great tradition. As both a roots and progressive drummer, he has been acknowledged as key to the band's powerful on-stage and in-studio presence. He and Dusty, in their early years together, served as Lightnin' Hopkins' rhythm section which, as Frank tells it, was a life changing experience. Frank, despite his last name, is the guy in the band without a beard. But when you're with him, you're with a Beard. He's a rockin' paradox who provides the pulse of ZZ TOP.

ZZ TOP's music is always instantly recognizable, eminently powerful, profoundly soulful and 100% Texas American in derivation. The band's support for the blues is unwavering both as interpreters of the music and preservers of its legacy. It was ZZ TOP that celebrated "founding father" Muddy Waters by turning a piece of scrap timber than had fallen from his sharecropper's shack into a beautiful guitar, dubbed the "Muddywood." This totem was sent on tour as a fundraising focus for The Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi, site of Robert Johnson's famed "Crossroads" encounter with the devil. ZZ TOP's support and link to the blues remains as rock solid as the music they continue to play. They have sold millions of records over the course of their career, have been officially designated as Heroes of The State of Texas, have been referenced in countless cartoons and sitcoms and are true rock icons but, against all odds, they're really just doing what they've always done. They're real and they're surreal and they're ZZ TOP.
The Doobie Brothers
The Doobie Brothers
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.


Singer-songwriter-guitarist Pat Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"
The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have 3 multi-platinum, 7 platinum and 14 Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than 11 million copies – a rare "diamond record." The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.


Their No. 1 singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include "Jesus Is Just All Right", "Rockin' Down the Highway", "Long Train Runnin'", "China Grove", "Take Me In Your Arms", Takin' it to the Streets", "Minute by Minute", "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.


In 2011, the band marked a new chapter. They filmed a CMT Crossroads special with superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. Their relationship with Nashville continues to unfold, with a new country-based Doobie Brothers project recorded with some of country music's biggest stars set for release later this year.


Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman, and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.
The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.


Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."
The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.
"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."


He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."
The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.


Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band -- you always return to who you really are."


While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.


Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"


That approach is little changed in the new millennium. Their recent release World Gone Crazy's title track, penned by Johnston, dwells on the economic tumult of 2011, while Simmons' "Far From Home," a moving reflection about a child taking leave of home, has a subtext familiar to any American family that has sent a son or daughter off to war. The band's concern for family and those who serve our country is reflected in their having raised over $3 million for veterans related causes.
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.


Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."


"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."


The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.


Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:
"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."
Venue Information:
Maryhill Winery
9774 Highway 14
Goldendale, WA, 98620
http://maryhillwinery.com/